Humor, a Characteristic of Being in the Blue

Humor facilitates communication inside the workplace, builds relationships with both external and internal customers, reduces stress, provides perspective and promotes energy in the workplace. Fun is healthy just like cod liver oil.

A little old lady tells her butcher she wants a piece of beef with no fat and no bone.  He says, “Lady, we’ve been trying to grow them that way for years, and they just keep falling over.”

Humor provides ways by which employees or employers can communicate with others without intensifying the emotional temperature of the relationship.  Humor holds down the roof just like shingles and nails.

Coming off a late appointment, a traveler finds a restaurant close to the hotel.  The waitress unenthusiastically appears.  “What do you want?” 

He decided to get a head start on tomorrow and orders breakfast.  

“Hrumph,” she retorted and walked off.  She comes back with the food, bangs down the plate, spills the orange juice and starts to leave. “… and a kind word when you come back.” 

The customer responds, “Just a minute please.  Where is my kind word?” 

The waitress then leans over and quietly says, “Don’t eat the eggs.”

Humor is one of the healthiest and most powerful methods to help provide perspective on life’s challenging experiences, and it is frequently helpful during periods of a crisis.  As time passes and distance from the disaster will achieve, humor may help, “It wasn’t funny at the time,” comes to mind.

An airline passenger says, “I want to fly to Chicago, I want this bag sent to Los Angeles and the other bags sent to Orlando.”  Agents say, “We can’t do that.”  Passenger replies, “You did it last week.”

When asked about the qualities of a capable employee, senior administrators and human relations personnel check humor as one of the choice attributes.  Humor makes the day go well just like a good breakfast of oatmeal with raisins.

The captain comes on the intercom, “I’m sorry to announce this flight will have a delay of thirty minutes.  That’s what I’m supposed to tell you.  The machine that pulls the handles off the luggage is broken, and it takes longer to do it by hand.”

Work is often associated with stress, one of the leading causes of illness, absenteeism and employee burn-out.  Humor is a great stress reliever because it makes you feel good.  You can’t feel right and feel stress at the same time.

A customer is persistent in attacking, discounting and complaining about all the problems with purchases he has made in the past six years. 

Exasperated, the clerk says, “Just a moment, sir.  If I give you all your money back, give you a new one of everything you bought for free, close the store and shoot the manager, would you be happy?” 

The customer replied, “Of course not.”

Studies show that only 15% of workers are let go because of a lack of competence.  The remaining 85% due to their inability to get along with their fellow employees and customers.  Go figure!

Customer asks where are the self-help section of books?  The clerk says, “If I tell you, it will defeat the purpose.”

Resilience is the ability to spring back from stressors in the environment.  Humor can help build resilience because it stimulates the production of physical and psychological antibodies.

A man wrote a motel he planned to visit.  “I would like very much to bring my dog with me,” he wrote.  “The dog is well-groomed and very well-behaved.  Would you be willing to permit me to keep him in my room at night?”  An immediate reply from the owner read, “I’ve been operating this motel for many years.  In all that time, I’ve never had a dog steal towels, bedclothes, silverware or pictures off the wall.  I’ve never had to evict a dog in the middle of the night for being drunk and disorderly.  I’ve never had a dog run out on a bill.  Yes, indeed, your dog is welcome at my motel. If your dog vouches for you, then you are welcome to stay here too.

Laughter physiology.  Heart rate speeds up, blood flow increases, muscles convulse, and hundreds of biochemical changes occur.  What’s not clear is the exact nature of these changes.  Is it laughter that causes these changes or is the biochemical changes a result of another factor such as the increase in breathing during laughter?  The data is unclear.  Who cares?  Have a good belly laugh.

Our Colors and What They Mean

Words spoken to people only account for a small portion of what is discussed between one person to another. You get a much more significant picture of what is being communicated by being aware of both verbal and nonverbal communication.  We use the colors of Grey, Green, Red and Blue as our behavior descriptions.  (They […]